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Category — Guest Blogger

THIS is How To Pay for College

pickuoguitarclubBy Guest Blogger Jack Ross
Co-Founder, PickupGuitarClub.com
Like many, Jack Ross, a high school student from Washington D.C., falls in financial aid no man’s land. With most colleges topping $45,000 a year, his chance of leaving school in four years without a crippling amount of debt is bleak. Despite his near perfect test scores and GPA, scholarships are few and far between. So, he decided to fund his own schooling by teaching others.

Jack and his best friend, Brian Abod, recently launched a Kickstarter crowdfunding effort for their music education website PickupGuitarClub.com.

Jack is a self-taught software developer who built his first tablet computer at age 12, and Brian is a self-taught multi-instrumentalist. Together they developed a learning environment that is the first of its kind.

Centered on gamification and popular songs, their website turns learning guitar into an enjoyable experience. Jack developed polyphonic note-recognition software that listens to the guitar as it is played, rewarding players’ improvement and demonstrating how to improve where needed. The intuitive user interface breaks down every part of guitar from notes and rhythm to technique and chord shapes, making it easier than ever to follow along.

Brian taught himself guitar through songs and designed the curriculum in the same way. Songs like Sweet Home Alabama, Wagon Wheel, and Hey There Delilah teach all the skills needed to play guitar – picking, fretting, scales, chords, and more.

It is like Guitar Hero for real guitar.

With the funding from Kickstarter, they will finish the development and launch their company. Profits from the company will go towards funding their college education.

Here is their video describing their project:
Embed: <iframe width=”480″ height=”360″ src=”https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/pickupguitarclub/pickup-guitar-club-finally-a-fun-way-to-learn-guit/widget/video.html” frameborder=”0″ scrolling=”no”> </iframe>
If you want to support these young men and their endeavors, visit their Kickstarter campaign page – bit.ly/PickupGuitarClub

A few words from DollarDays:
Jack Ross contacted Marc Joseph, CEO of DollarDays.com about an article Marc wrote last October for the Huffington Post, titled “It’s Too Expensive to go to College Anymore.” Jack asked us to take a look at his story to see if we would publish it, since Marc and Jack are basically coming from the same place about getting an education today: it’s hard to get money to pay for college.

DollarDays hopes you’ll take a look at their project and possibly donate a buck or two. We think these two young men are rising stars to watch!

 

April 14, 2014   No Comments

Old World Egg Nog will Spice Up your Holidays!

 

Josh Froelichby Josh Froelich

I love finding simple old world recipes and bringing them back to life. And this old world egg nog recipe is so delicious, after one sip, even egg nog nay sayers will have a glass! Or two!

This recipe is a delicious trip back in time. There are several origins of the word “nog.” One is a block of wood or a cup carved from a block of wood. I like to use a handmade palm wood cup from Thailand to sip my egg nog.  An alternate definition is “a strong beer” from Norfolk, England.

For this recipe I prefer using an Oatmeal Stout.  The history of Oatmeal Stout dates back to the mid to late 1800s, with the discovery that adding oats to beer made it healthier. This new creation was often considered a table beer and prescribed to nursing mothers and ailing children and believed to be a remedy for sickness in general.

Now that you know a little egg nog history, are you ready to try the best egg nog on the planet?

eggnog

Ingredients

10 oz of oatmeal stout

4 oz bourbon (optional)

4 large organic farm fresh eggs separated

2/3 cup pure organic cane sugar

1/4 tsp fresh ground nutmeg

1/2 pinch of cinnamon

1/2 tsp vanilla

2 cups whole milk

1 cup heavy cream

Directions

Separate the eggs, putting the whites in one bowl and the yolks in another.

Hand beat the egg whites until stiff peaks form.

In the other bowl, beat the yolks, sugar and vanilla until light in color and creamy.

Add the milk, cream, nutmeg and cinnamon, mix until well combined.

Gently fold the egg whites back into mixture with the beer and bourbon.

 

Enjoy your egg nog! Happy holidays from Josh Froelich, DollarDays’ resident purveyor of fine food, drink and other random finds (he even makes his own wine). And of course, happy holidays, merry egg nog and good health from all of us at DollarDays.

 

 

December 14, 2013   No Comments

Facebook brings people together during life’s milestones

by guest blogger, Jackie Eldridge

The last thing I want to sound like is an advertisement for Facebook. (That’s my caveat for this post.)

I know I’ve said many times that Facebook and Google are taking over the world. Maybe I should say they’re changing the world instead. Despite all the push-back each giant receives regarding privacy, I believe the ability to share our lives to many usurps the threat of privacy. (Hmmm. There used to be  a mega giant called the yellow pages who had all of our private information and published it in a book!! Then they distributed to everyone!! Hope this puts Facebook in perspective.)

My cousin Patrick and his partner Tabatha had their first child last week. Facebook kept me in the loop to the point that I almost felt like I was in Ohio with them. I read updates, enjoyed videos and chatted with family. Pretty amazing that technology can bring people together during a major life event. The photos and videos meant everything to me.

Then there’s my friend Lindsay. Her father has had stage IV cancer for a year now. I read her posts, and those of her siblings, as her dad transitioned from hospital to hospice. Reading the posts not only kept me connected, but I couldn’t help but feel that Facebook was serving a much larger purpose for Lindsay and her three siblings. They were posting their feelings, talking to God, praying, reminiscing, sharing photos—truly commemorating their lives with their father. This morning, when their dad passed, I read their posts and felt connected to them, and most of all, they were connected to each other. I cried for them. Today, on his death, I know his life was full—as full as a parent’s could be—because he, too, got to witness how his kids and grandkids expressed their feelings and love for him, with some thanks to Facebook. When a loved one is passing,  we often break that stubborn dam of intimacy and flood them with last words and pent-up emotions. While I have no doubt that Linds and family did their share of “flooding” with their dad, I know that being able to emote on Facebook for the past three weeks has been a great release for them. And it’s made them a closer family.

Despite the privacy issues (that we need to constantly monitor) Facebook’s ability to bring people together during life’s milestones is a gift.

November 15, 2013   1 Comment

Converse, Don’t Complain

by Hiroshi Mikitani, CEO, Rakuten Inc., from LinkedIn

ballSometime today, you may take a break from your work and walk around the office. Perhaps you will talk to a colleague. What will you say? Will you complain about the boss? About the workload? About the weather?

That is common. But it’s not helpful. If you work in a big company, chances are this kind of complaining is what usually goes on in the hallways. But if you look at small companies – at venture start-ups – there is a different buzz in the halls. That’s the sound of conversation.

The best part about being an up-and-coming company was always having someone to play verbal “catch” with. Starting a company is an experiment of trial and error, and when something happens you always end up discussing it with those around you. When Rakuten was in its early stages, there were not many employees, and the office was small. It was as if we were playing verbal “catch” 24 hours a day, all year long. It is no exaggeration to say that Rakuten today was born out of the conversations of that period.

In bigger companies, that natural ongoing conversation may fall off. When that happens, the company loses a critical tool.

In the same way that pro baseball players use a game of catch to warm up and check their form, you can use conversation to verify whether your own way of thinking and judgment are correct or not.

Try raising an issue – “throwing a ball around” – with those nearest to you. People are strange creatures. In most instances, if you throw a ball to someone, they will throw it back. And from there you can start playing catch. This is much more constructive than just approaching other people to complain about your boss or coworkers, or to gossip. And more than just helping you to find a good conversation partner, it is fun.

October 30, 2013   No Comments

Are your employees helping you LOSE money?

by Guest blogger, Chuck Vance, President, MaskMail.com

employee theft - CopyDo you know if your employees are stealing from you or, if a manager is sexually harassing one of his/her subordinates or, if you have an employee who is about to “go postal” at your business or, if you have people using illegal drugs while driving company vehicles?

Most business owners and managers would probably respond: “Of course, I talk to my employees and they talk to me, so I pretty much know what is going on. Besides, we are like family.”

Unfortunately, experts and statistics would tell you that that is your perception and not the reality. Let’s just take one category of what you don’t know, and it is the one that probably everyone thinks of first—- employee theft.

The FBI calls employee theft “the fastest growing crime in America” and adds that this trend is having a devastating effect on small businesses.  The U. S. Chamber of Commerce estimates that 75% of employees steal from the workplace and that most do so repeatedly. The Department of Commerce estimates that employee theft of cash, property, and merchandise may cost American businesses as much as $50 billion per year. That sounds like a lot, but consider if one of your trusted employees is taking just one pack of cigarettes per day (5 days per week), at your store—you lose, (in revenues), between $2,000 and $3,000, per year.

The average annual loss suffered by small businesses (fewer than 100 people) is $200,000, which is significantly higher than the average loss in any other category, including the largest businesses. Would you be surprised to know that it is estimated that about one third of all corporate bankruptcies are “directly” caused by employee theft? What if you had that $200,000, (or even part of it), back in the business? Could it have kept you out of bankruptcy?

You may be thinking, “That can’t be true; why would there be greater losses in a smaller business, where you know the people better, than in a larger company?” Let’s look at the factors that make small businesses especially vulnerable to employee theft and fraud. For one, small businesses generally have more limited resources to devote toward crime detection—they are busy focusing on trying to keep the doors open. When they do spend time and effort on theft deterrence, they think about protecting their company from external theft, not internal theft. In addition, small companies often include employees with multiple responsibilities (people known in baseball as “utility players”), who are not closely supervised. This provides them a greater opportunity to commit and conceal illegal activities. Furthermore, the family-like atmosphere of many small businesses may, believe it or not, lead to higher rates of employee theft—because owners of such businesses place too much faith in the belief that familiarity breeds honesty—which is not true.

And remember, thus far we are only talking about employee theft.

How about sexual harassment? Would it surprise you to know that in a recent survey taken of 782 U.S. workers that 31% of the females revealed that they had been sexually harassed at work—43% of those were harassed by a supervisor? The Business Forum estimates that over $20 billion is spent each year by businesses for litigation—and that does not include settlements or judgments.

There are other issues such as workplace violence, discrimination, alcohol or drugs in the workplace, and many more.

So, if we realize that we probably have problems in our business that we are not aware of, how do we find out about them? Do we meet collectively, or even privately, with our employees and say, “Come on, tell me what you know?” How effective do you think that that would be?  Most people will not step forward with negative information for a number of reasons:

They don’t want to be branded as “snitches” and they don’t want to be ostracized, ridiculed, or perhaps retaliated against by their peers, or even supervisors. They don’t think that their information is important enough to pass along and they don’t believe that management truly wants them to report issues—and make waves.

If these are their concerns, how do we assuage them? How can we get them to provide information to you that could, if unreported, harm the company and its bottom line?

There are anonymous reporting systems which are the proven, most cost effective methods to find out what is going on in your company.  A program is established for your employees to anonymously report information without fear of retaliation.  This is a program that you can establish, endorse and publicize to your employees, vendors, contractors and even customers— because YOU DO CARE, and, YOU DO WANT TO HEAR FROM THEM!

But should that anonymous e-mail and/or phone line go to someone within the company? If you were reporting that your boss was sexually harassing his secretary or that your office manager was taking free trips from vendors, would you e-mail or phone a tip to someone within the company and hope that your voice, or e-mail address, wouldn’t be recognized? Or, would you be concerned that you would be identified and that overtly, or covertly, you would be punished for reporting?

Far more effective, both from a quantity and quality of reported information, is for businesses to use a professional vendor, with a qualified and trained staff, as a 24/7 conduit between the employees, and them. Having a third party between the reporter and management, (with rapid transmission of the report), gives the reporter the confidence to fully and frankly report without being identified.

Also, businesses can tailor the questions that they would like the vendor to ask a reporter and require that the vendor support many different languages so that reporters will feel comfortable communicating in their native language. In fact, because the communication through the vendor is anonymous, the vendor can facilitate an open dialogue between the reporter and the company, increasing the comfort level of the reporter and the likelihood that an incident will be reported.

Business owners and managers can ask follow-up questions through the vendor to gain additional insight and further their investigation.

So, is the anonymous reporting program, with submissions by e-mail or voice mail, monitored and relayed by trained professionals around the clock, 365 days of the year, in almost any language, expensive?

Surprisingly, no. And such a program is easy to incorporate into your business.  At the program’s inception there is a small, one time, start-up fee to get your company set up in the vendor’s software. Then your business and your employees are provided with posters (to be placed in strategic areas around the workplace), wallet size cards (giving URL for the reporting website and the toll free number). You, as the boss, designate who you want to receive the reports. After the start-up charge, you have a very reasonable monthly fee (based usually on the number of employees that you have in the company). That rate remains the same through-out the term of the agreement, no matter how many reports and responses you have each month. The start-up charge and monthly fee could easily be recouped by your company just by detecting and correcting one issue (e.g., someone stealing from you). The deterrent effect alone of such a program will probably save you enough money to more than offset the expenditure.

As an added bonus, an anonymous reporting system also qualifies as one of the reporting methods mandated by the Sarbanes-Oxley (SOX) Act of 2002. In fact, some insurance companies have given premium discounts to businesses that utilize an anonymous reporting system. So, both the government and insurance companies must believe that such a program is an effective deterrent, and an effective self-policing tool.

Sound easy? That’s because it is. You go about doing what you do best for your company. When issues are reported, depending on their nature and seriousness, you resolve them knowing that you probably caught them early, before they became a more expensive and endemic problem.

So, as we’ve shown, you really can’t know everything that is going on in your company, no matter how small or large it might be. Then why not find an excellent vendor and enroll your company in an anonymous reporting program? Companies that have, see positive results. Their employees feel good that they have a way of communicating with management and reporting issues, even making minor suggestions, or voicing complaints—without revealing their identity. Management knows that by having a reliable, effective method to anonymously receive reports, they will probably get an early “heads up” about issues that they would otherwise not see or hear of. Even contractors, vendors, and customers will feel good because they know they are doing business with a company that has an effective tool for dealing with inappropriate behaviors.

So, don’t you think that it is time for you to enroll your business in an anonymous reporting program so that you’ll never have to say, “I wish that someone would have told us about that!”?

October 21, 2013   No Comments

Helping others is what we’re all about

Pinelake IndiaIf you know anything at all about DollarDays, then you know we always like to help others in need.  And we love to hear about others doing the same and thought we’d share a story of a customer who is devoted to helping others.

Pinelake Church, with several locations in Mississippi, is helping people in Punjab, India who are in need.  Teams from Pinelake Church travel to India and offer a Compassion Kit that is a good-sized box filled with practical living items like soap, toothpaste, t-shirts and other basic items.  The Kit is a gift that also shares the story of Jesus and gives the opportunity for a person to begin their own story of knowing Jesus.

DollarDays feels fortunate to be Pinelake Church’s wholesale connection for the contents of the Compassion Kits. It’s projects like these that make us feel like we are making a difference too.

Keep up the good work, Pinelake Church!

October 9, 2013   No Comments

9 tips for writing sticky SEO content

google worldby Jackie Eldridge

Let’s face it, Google DOES rule the world. Or at least our online world of e-commerce where we constantly fight an uphill battle for search engine rankings. If you don’t keep up with Google’s algorithm changes, you may be headed backwards, instead of climbing that hill.

Google recently announced its latest algorithm update, Google Caffeine, which is a completely new way of indexing. It’s important you understand that the freshness of your content is going to be more important than ever before. This means that you need to post as often as you can and constantly update on trending topics related to your business, if you want to climb that hill to higher search engine rankings.

Two other updates prior to Caffeine (Panda and Penguin) focus on the uniqueness of content, fresh content and social media. Penguin will penalize you, even blacklist you, if you copy (plagiarize) content and also wants to see at least 60% unique content site-wide. Let this be your guide for creating content that will organically improve your search engine rankings, which will ultimately improve your sales and revenue.

So, what is search engine content, exactly? The most effective search engine content appeals both to readers and search engines. It can be tricky (like talking out of both sides of your mouth, sometimes!), as you are basically writing articles and reviews for readers, but at the same time it’s search engines that monitor your content and feed it to readers through searches. It’s not enough just to create a website anymore. A website’s content development and visibility to search engines is much more important. I’ll be outlining nine recommendations, that will help make your e-commerce store or sales on third party marketplaces more successful. That said, it’s a given that you need to create your “own voice” and write in a manner that, depending on your business, is memorable, maybe funny but for certain, credible.

1. Choosing the Right Keywords
Search engines identify your website content with the help of keywords. These are usually very closely related to the search terms that are entered by the users in search engines. Before writing any topic for your website or blog, you will need to conduct a thorough research on the keywords that are closely associated with the topic. You could make use of keyword research tools like Google AdWords’ Keyword Planner  to find the most popular keywords. Just Google AdWords Keyword Planner to learn more.

2. Readability
Please remember that you are writing for your readers and not search engines. You might find it difficult to use some of the popular keywords grammatically, but you cannot really afford to skip it all together. Although search engines look for the keywords in particular, they would want the readers to read quality content. Therefore, you will need to make sure that the content is interesting and adds value to the readers, instead of just stuffing it with overused keywords. Keywords should not stop the content flow.

3. Along with readability comes Content Relevancy
Make sure that you make use of keywords while maintaining the relevancy to your content. Search engines employ a number of algorithms to detect content that has been created with the sole purpose to obtain good ranking. This type of content will increase your chances of your website getting blacklisted by search engines, which is the equivalent to a slow death. Plus, readers can identify content that has been created for keywords and it will turn them off and you will lose credibility with them…and search engines.

4. Keyword Placement
Now that you know NOT to overuse keywords, the best way to use them is in the beginning of paragraphs and subheads. In the other parts of your content you can use synonymous phrases instead of the keywords.

5. Keep it short
Users hate reading big blocks of copy. Big blocks of copy turns readers off —they want short, succinct information blocks that can help them learn something, solve a problem or make a buying decision. Four to five lines in a paragraph is plenty.

6. A little bit of magic: Use Bullets and Numbering
This is a complement to short paragraphs. In today’s world, people do not have time to read everything they see on the web.  That said, it’s up to you to make it as simple as possible for them to grasp your message by using bullets and numbering, so they can get the gist of your content in a quick scan to decide if it is of real interest to them. If it is, they’ll read it in its entirety.

7. Subheads are a proven tool to boost readership
If you have to hyperlink any of your content to another page, make sure the links are relevant to the content.  If the page you are linking to is not relevant to your content, you will lose credibility and the search engines will hate you for “link spamming.” Readers hate being redirected to spam links too. Once you lose a reader or your search engine ranking, it’s hard to get them back.

8. Be sure your links are relevant to your content
If you have to hyperlink any of your content to another page, make sure the links are relevant to the content.  If the page you are linking to is not relevant to your content, you will lose credibility and the search engines will hate you for “link spamming.” Readers hate being redirected to spam links too. Once you lose a reader or your search engine ranking, it’s hard to get them back.

9. Proofreading!
If you’re like me, you are bound to make mistakes while writing. Make sure you proofread your articles or posts carefully before publishing them. Use spellcheck!  If you have someone else who can read it for typos, clarity and grammar, that would be ideal.

 

 

September 20, 2013   No Comments

What Content Marketing Offers to E-Commerce Sites

By Guest Blogger Joseph Berida

content marketingContent marketing is one of the biggest trending marketing techniques today. How exactly does it help the many e-commerce site owners looking to boost their sales? To find the answer to that question, we must first understand what content marketing really is.

The Importance of Value

Content marketing is a holistic approach to providing more value to your target audience based on a variety of compelling and useful content distributed through the right channels.

Basically, it’s giving relevant information to your prospects and customers for free. The idea is that they will learn to appreciate your content, and in return learn to trust you as a quality content provider. They won’t just allow you to send them more content; they will actively search for it and share it through their own networks.

By educating them about your industry and how your products are the best in the business, you generate more qualified leads, turn leads into customers, and one-time customers into brand loyalists.

Getting Friendly with Search

By delivering a constant stream of new and informative content on your e-commerce site that people share (whether it’s through social media or links from other websites), you are also improving your chances of ranking higher on search engines.

Search engines want to make it as easy as possible for people to find quality content by linking to them in the top results pages. Search is still the number one avenue for direct traffic in e-commerce sites, so it’s critical that you are ranking high.

Creating the Right Content

You can start mapping out your content strategy with different types of content that will cater to the special desires of an e-commerce audience.

Blog

There is a reason why blogs are still in use today by businesses, including Dollar Days. According to a 2012 Burst Media Survey, 8 out of 10 Americans within the 18-34 age range say that blog posts with brand mentions influence their purchasing decisions.

The angle of content marketing isn’t always self-promotion. Instead of talking about your own products, tackle issues that are relevant to your industry, whether they are problems your customers are facing or the challenges you and your competitors need to overcome.

Video

Video is your greatest tool in informing your audience about the products you’re selling, as humans favor visual information. We simply understand things better when we’re shown what they offer and how they work.

Record instructional videos of your products in use as well as the benefits they provide. Your site’s visitors will feel more assured seeing your products working just as you market them.

Experts’ Insights

Another avenue where people can find out more information regarding industry issues as well as the products you’re offering is through engagement with experts in the field. If you have contacts with thought leaders or at least those with the proper credentials to their name, set up a section on your site where they can receive questions from visitors and have them answer those questions

User-Generated Content

Besides hearing from authorities in the industry, buyers are more likely to listen to the recommendations of real people who’ve tried the products themselves than your own promotional efforts.  Allow customers to write reviews on your products. Feature the ringing endorsements on your product pages.

Spread the Word

As mentioned above, there is still the marketing side to content marketing. You’ll need to get your content out in the open if you don’t have a recognizable brand.

Social media is one of the more obvious platforms to share your content. Facebook and Twitter are the biggest sites, but you can also try out image-based sites such as Pinterest and Instagram where you can share photos.

Don’t forget to include share buttons within the pages of your content so that visitors can easily post them on their social networks.

Participate in active forums that are related to your business. Once you’ve proven yourself as a contributor, you can drop links to content within your site in your forum posts.

Email is a platform where you can directly engage with customers. You can create a newsletter where you can regularly send updates about your products with links to your site’s content as well as exclusive offers such as discounts and promos.

Consumers are constantly searching for quality content online. Capture their attention on all fronts with the right kind of information spread out through multiple channels, and you’ll earn their trust that they’ll want to do business with you.

September 3, 2013   No Comments

Incentives for Reusable Grocery Bags

By Guest Blogger Ali Pourvasei

tote eco friendlyReusable grocery bags are becoming a popular among those who are concerned about our Earth, but what about those who are more concerned about their wallets?  Sadly, there are many people who may balk at buying a reusable bag when they have no monetary incentive. Many stores have realized this and have created incentive plans to help encourage bargain hunters to help cut down on waste.

Free Bag Giveaways

The first step to switching customers over to reusable grocery bags is to get customers to try them out. One of the best ways to do this is to offer free reusable bags like the recent effort to free Los Angeles of plastic bag waste. A group of grocery stores agreed to give away free grocery bags for LA’s annual “Day Without a Bag.” This effort has led to a 95% reduction in plastic bag distribution in L.A.

Discounts on Groceries

Once customers have some reusable grocery bags, the next step is to give them incentive to remember to use them. There are many different ways to offer discounts. Her are four popular ways some stores approach it:

  • In 2009, Target started offering a discount of five cents for every reusable bag a customer used. It doesn’t have to be a Target bag, but it does have to be a cloth bag.
  • CVS Pharmacy offers a discount for reusable grocery bags that is based on the number of uses rather than the number of bags. A small green card with a barcode is scanned every time the customer goes through the line, and every fourth trip the customer earns on dollar in CVS store credit.
  • In addition to offering its own reusable bags, Kroger also offers a discount of four cents per grocery bag. While it’s not a large amount, large families with lots of groceries will find that it adds up fast.
  • KTA Super Stores also offers a discount, but theirs is for every bag that the customer brings in, whether plastic or reusable. They offer various rates for customers based on the size and type of bag they choose to bring to the store.

Charging For Plastic

In the effort to cut down on plastic waste, some cities such as Washington, D.C., Austin, TX  and San Diego, CA are requiring retailers to charge customers for plastic bags. Other places may follow their lead to get the consumer on board with the green effort.

A Little Push Goes a Long Way

No matter what kind of incentive is used, the main goal is simply to reward customers for bringing in a reusable bag.  The change to reusable bags is one widely embraced, but as history shows, human beings can resist change, even when it is a good one. Creating store or city wide incentives can be the extra push that helps consumers buy reusable bags and then continue to use them. When it comes to helping our environment and preserving our world, that little push can make a huge difference.

September 3, 2013   No Comments

5 ways to put a personal touch on small biz

small bizBy guest blogger Laura.Colado of Bongo International

One of the perks of having a small business is that you have more freedom to personalize interactions and follow-ups.  However, many small businesses actually fail to use this to their advantage by formalizing processes for customer engagement.  Instead of attempting to prematurely “corporatize” your business, indulge in the personal touch that a small business brings to the table.

Fox Business Small Business Center has published a short list of five ways that you can add a personal touch to your small business. This can be accomplished with an array of initiatives such as hand-written thank you notes and a true open-door policy for customers and employees.

Read the full list HERE, and start interacting with your customers on a more personal level today!

June 4, 2013   No Comments